Thursday, November 22, 2012

Native American Salt Sticks - Science Play


Native Americans collected salt on sticks and carried the salt to areas where it was not readily available. They would place the sticks in a shallow lagoon in an upright position. When the salty ocean water evaporated, the salt crystallized on the sticks. The salted sticks were wrapped into bundles to trade.
They followed trade routes to inland ares and traded for such items as obsidian, which they used to make arrow heads.

What we did:
  1. Pour 1 cup of hot tap water into a small mixing bowl.
  2. Add 1/4 cup of table salt to the water and stir until dissolved.
  3. Continue adding small amounts of salt until no more will dissolve.
  4. Add bits of clay or wax to the bottom of a shallow bowl. Make sure it is thick enough to hold toothpicks in an upright position.
  5. Add your toothpicks in the clay/wax.
  6. Pour the saltwater solution over the toothpicks in the bowl.
  7. Continue to add water to the bowl until your solution covers the toothpicks by at least a 1/5.
  8. Set the bowl in a sunny window and check it each day.
Observe the day to day changes!

PhotobucketWe Made That

22 comments:

  1. This is pretty neat!! ☺
    Thanks for stopping by my blog. Hope you have a lovely day tomorrow.

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  2. Hey, thanks for following Carole's Chatter. I have followed you right back. Have a great week.

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  3. Thanks for stopping by my blog and for tha follow :) I'm following back
    -Mariely @ Sensational Creations

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  4. This will be so much fun to do with the kids! :) Thanks for stopping by the Crazy Train-- nice to meet ya!

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  5. What a fun learning craft! Thank you so much for linking to SHOW-licious Craft Showcase! :)

    http://sew-licious.blogspot.com/2012/11/show-licious-craft-showcase-9-blog-party.html

    Marti

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  6. Bear With Me...am currently reading 'Salt, a World History' and am just now covering the American Indians♫♪ What a coincidence ♥

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  7. those turned out really cool! thanks for linking up to tip-toe thru tuesday!

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  8. So cool!
    Thanks for linking up to TGIF! Have a great week,
    Beth =-)

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  9. What a great experiment!! Thanks for sharing with us at Eco-Kids Tuesday!

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  10. How fun - I will have to give this a try with my grandkids. Thank you.

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  11. Ooh what sciency fun! Fantastic.

    Thanks for sharing on Kids Get Crafty!

    Maggy

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  12. This is awesome!! I'm a complete science nerd, and I love (love!) this! I'm going to pin it and share it on my PreschoolPowolPackets Facebook page!!

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  13. Great project! Thanks so much for sharing on Craft Schooling Sunday! I hope to see you again when the party resume on the first Sunday in January! Have a joyous holiday season!

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  14. I love this! New follower here. Please come share at my weekly Farm Girl Blog Fest. http://fresh-eggs-daily.blogspot.com/2012/11/farm-girl-blog-fest-10.html

    I would love to see you there!
    Lisa
    Fresh Eggs Daily

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  15. What a neat activity!! Thank you for sharing at Sharing Saturday!

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  16. This is a great activity. It's so different and interesting! It's fun too. I'm pinning this! Thanks for sharing on Eco Kids!

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  17. Love the history paired with the science here. Thanks for sharing at the Sunday Showcase!

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  18. I haven't seen that one before, and I learned something new about Native American tribes.

    Thanks for linking up to Science Sunday!

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  19. How cool is this!?!?!
    I'll have to do this with my little man!

    Following back from the Sunday Sync!

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  20. One of my favorite things about your blog is that you always teach me something. I never knew that the Indians made salt sticks. What a cool history lesson and science experiment in one! Thanks for sharing on We Made That!

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  21. My four year old will be completely fascinated with this! Thanks for sharing!

    Kathy Shea Mormino
    The Chicken Chick

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